Sunday, January 4, 2009

Day 4: Adjusting slowly

Hi all! It's Joy this time-- Paul will take over these posts before long, but for now he's still focusing on adjusting to life at sea.

He called this morning, and reports that his stomach isn't what he'd call normal, but it's definitely improving. He sounds very tired, but he mustered up the energy to leave me with a list of things to do, so I know he's on the mend. Also, he continues to make good progress at the oars, which is encouraging!

His proximity alarm still isn't working as intended, and he's using his backup steering system while he sorts out what seems to be a jam in his toe-steering. We're confident that both issues can be resolved, but until then he's not getting much sleep. He spent last night in a pattern of setting the rudder and checking for nearby ships, then lying in the cabin for 2 hours telling himself not to get up and do it all over again. Oh, and he did get splashed in the face after leaving his hatch cracked to air out the cabin. Imagine lying in bed, somewhere between asleep and awake, and having a bucket of water thrown in your face. This was an entertaining visual for me, but Paul was less amused by the experience.

Despite the mechanical issues, we are all encouraged by the fact that everything he's experienced physically and mentally so far has been anticipated, and prepared for as well as possible. Thanks to the ocean rowing community for all the good advice!

Ok, nobody can tell Paul I posted this, but here's a shot of him trying not to be sick on the ferry to La Gomera. If you're having trouble picturing what Paul looks like nauseous, this will help:[note to The Boyz-- I know you have all the visuals of this you could need already!]





Perhaps as motivation for Paul to get on his feet and start updating the blog himself, I'll post some evidence of his dancing abilities tomorrow [hint: Ridleys are not known for rhythm]....

In the meantime, stay tuned, and thanks for the support! Things are going well overall, and improving every day!

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

I hope there is a post of a pic from Gdovin's wedding! The steering isn't working...oh man. Time to rely ond sea turtles to show the way. I can't wait to see that beard 2 months from now...going to be mean that is for sure.

As far as the sea sickness....suck it up! it isn't like you just had to drink wilsons!!!

MAYE

Karen Tomic and Granny said...

Hi Paul - I'm here with Granny Flo showing the website & setting her up to follow you along. She has already admionished that you should have had candied ginger along for the seasickness. It's what she always gave Liz. Everyone here continues to think about you and wish you well - we're counting days to Antigua.

Anonymous said...

Hey Paul, Rowed in the cold Atlantic today, off Portsmouth,NH. Thought of you, and tried to send good vibes, calm seas, and a lack of motion sickness your way.Best of luck. M Allen ps Ginger works wonders

Corey said...

Dude,

I can picture your seasick face...similar to the frequent pulling of the trigger to lessen the all day in bed hang-overs!!

Cant wait to read your posts buddy!

BAZ

Anonymous said...

Rid,
Pumped to hear that you're starting to feel better. Stop by the Flagship Inn Beach for a Black and Tan on your way to Antigua

Jack and Sylvia

Richard said...

Seasickness is easily underestimated. In reality it is a very big deal. Throughout history many ships have been lost due to their officers and crew being undermined by fatigue and the broad impact of what we call “seasickness”. To compare it to a hangover or similar event is grossly unfair. It can be one of those times where your worst fear is that you might actually live.

During the first day of the Head of the Charles I briefly met Paul and we talked about the challenge of “getting your sea legs” and other euphemisms. Simulating the first few days at sea in a small boat is so unpleasant that no one does it. Unfortunately there is no short cut. Someday – (hopefully soon) once the inner ears adjust – everything will miraculously improve.

Paul -- remain safe and hydrated and in a few days everything will be fine. Your systems are well thought out.

It could be worse – imagine if you were running a hedge fund!

God Speed,

RW

Anonymous said...

Rid,
I too can see your sea sickness as visions of the Norwegian Majesty flash before me, but it can't be any worse then the first sip of Storks that was taken in the summer of 2002

be safe

Gdovin

Anonymous said...

Congrats on the fantastic progress! I think it's okay to back off the high stroke rate for now and drop to a consistent 20 SPM. ETS

Anonymous said...

3 things....

1) ridley, glad to hear you are doing well...keep it going...looking forward to reading your posts...
2)glad corey could take time out of his busy schedule to finally make a post...
and 3) and most importantly...happy 5th!!!! hope today is a glorious day on the open waters...

chucky

Anonymous said...

Hi Hammer,

Glad to hear you're feeling a bit better. I was in St Kitts last week. You'll be very happy to hear that the tradewinds are cranking there. You'll be able coast in to Antigua with a drink in hand! Keep up the good work buddy!

-Brian A.

Karen and Bill Tomic said...

This note is really for all the readers and supporters of Row For Hope: It is wonderful to see so many of you appearing here daily - sending encouragement, prayers, and smiles to Paul.Let's remember that the one thing that will get him through this challenge is that we are also responding to the other half of the challenge - the $500,000 for cancer research.Paul will be thrilled to get reports of a spike in contributions while he is on the water. Get on board. If everyone tells someone about Row for Hope-or puts up a picture in their office or classroom or lunchroom - or has the conversation at the local watering hole, then we'll be able to get our part of the job done and Paul will know that we got his message -anything is possible. Get those donations rolling in - no amount is too small! Thanks -

Keely said...

Paul, I've been without internet for the past week and just caught up on all the posts and comments. I'm so happy to hear you are off and doing well! Keep it going!

JoAnn said...

Hey Paul - Happy New Year! Glad to hear you're adjusting... keep rowing - kinda sounds like "suck it up!" LOL! Miss you. JoAnn@GA

Dr. Brian Nathanson said...

I hope you remembered to bring the tennis balls and thera bands. Although it doesn't sound like you will using the bands anytime soon, I think you might want to start tenderizing your low back and paraspinals before they get nasty. Hydration will be key as well.

I am with you in spirit and in awe.

Can't wait to hear your stories.

LovelyLadyLumps said...

I can totally relate, I was very "sea sick" yesterday, not from the Atlantic ocean, but uhh....from one too many Long Islands, pretty similar right?? Thinking about you lots Paul! Get R done!! xox